A.W. Faber Taschenstift No. 018

This pocket pencil and point protector were made by A.W. Faber-Castell. The point protector is nickel-plated and has a gold-plated tip and slide ring. Close inspection of the tip reveals a small imprint: “A.W. Faber Paris”

A.W. Faber Pocket Pencil 02b

I’m not certain of its exact age, but an example can be found in the 1909 company catalog among several varieties of Taschenstifte:

The pencil I have placed in it is flat (flach):

But its original pencil, though similar in color and length, is oval:

Pocket pencils like these were manufactured at least until the 1930s, perhaps even up to the Second World War (I’m currently looking into when the Eberhard Faber Co. stopped making them in the U.S.).

1909WK

The touch of gold on this model suggests it may not have been your every-day type of pocket pencil, but I wonder for how many years it was common—and expected—that you’d carry something similar every day.

Thanks to A.W. Faber-Castell for the scan of the 1909 catalog.

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3 Responses to A.W. Faber Taschenstift No. 018

  1. Gunther says:

    Thank you for showing these great items! The photos are fantastic; I especially like the last one. – It’s amazing that the cap has concave tip.

    Like

    • Sean says:

      Thanks, Gunther. Yes, the concave tip really is a nice touch — as if it was one extra design decision to more closely match the point of the pencil. Can we still call it a “cone” if it’s on a “flat” pencil? An “elliptical cone”, maybe? 🙂

      Like

      • Gunther says:

        I think it was an extra decision as a standard tip would have been easier to produce. I don’t know how it is properly called but elliptical cone sounds fitting.

        Like

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